Tuesday, August 6, 2013

Tigers are abroad!

How's that for an obvious statement?  And it must be said that the various races in different parts of the world aren't having too good a time of it either. But did you realise the same situation applies in the UK? Oh yes, our tigers are experiencing mixed fortunes as well and the sad thing is you're only likely to encounter them after dark.  Oh dear!

In the manner of old time practice I set my trap in a suitable place at the back of the house and can proudly claim to have caught several in one night!!  It looks as if things are looking good for the "official" UK wide survey on the 8th-10th August, 2013.  So, come on kids and Dads , let's have a bit of adventure on the next few evenings!!  And here's one of them I caught,



Isn't it a beauty?   Yes, it's a moth, whatever did you think otherwise?. Sadly it didn't opt to show its beautiful orange underwing with a dark band across its lower edge.

Now comes the serious bit. Over the 8th-10th August, 2013 Atropus and Butterfly Conservation in conjunction with the Centre for Ecology and Hydrology are encouraging people to trap or look out for Tiger Moths. In reality whatever you catch in that time can be reported on , but the objective this year is to try and get a better insight into our "tiger" populations.  The one seen above, Garden Tiger, is one everyone is worrying about as it appears to be in serious decline.  In southern England and the London area the Jersey Tiger is actually increasing its range and is the species which can be seen during the day. Another, the Ruby Tiger ( what a name! ) is also on the wing during August.

So, if this has caught your interest then simply look at www.mothnight.info where more information is available and is the site where you can submit your observations.  There is a very serious intent behind all this and your support is required so that we can gain a better idea of the distribution and numbers of this family of moths. Please try and help and I hope you enjoy it all.
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